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The Salmon Vorp

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There once stood a simple log cabin on the Refsnes oceanfront. In the cabin, men sat patiently waiting for the salmon to enter the bay. This was the vorp, an ancient fishing method which is also called ståarnot or sitjenot, meaning sitting net, because you sit, waiting and scouting for salmon. In the sea below...

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The Ice Pond

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At the start of the 20th century, landowner Anders Refsnes (1879-1939) dammed up the pond on his farm in order to produce ice. The ice from the new ice pond was needed to keep the salmon caught in the seine nets at the farm cold and fresh during the voyage to Trondheim. Today the ice...

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The Square Burial Mound

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Out here on the Refsnes cape there is a burial ground from the Iron Age. The ground consists of several circular mounds plus one that stands out; a very rare grave, quite unique in Norwegian context. The grave is a square mound, large and rectangular, almost like a land lot, constructed as a barrow of...

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The Large Stone Age Settlement at Refsnes

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An archaeologist walks along the trails at Refsnes. She’s looking for traces of Stone Age people. The search begins near the summit. In the early Stone Age, over nine thousand years ago, the land was depressed by the great ice sheet, and the sea level was much higher. People set up camp and settled at...

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The Three Dwellings at Refsnes

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Between five and six thousand years ago, there were three houses at Refsnes. Maybe not houses in the modern sense. But nevertheless solid structures, which provided shelter to the people who lived here at the time. From the Early Stone Age, over ten thousand years ago, people used a movable form of shelter, a tent...

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The Rissa Landslide

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On the 29th of April 1978, the largest quick clay landslide of the century struck Rissa. Over the course of 45 minutes, large tracts of firm ground was reduced to liquid clay. Fifteen farms, two family homes, a cabin and a community hall were eradicated and washed into the nearby lake. 32 people lost everything...

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Rein Abbey

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I am Sigrid Bårdsdatter, the first abbess of Rein Abbey. My half-brother was Duke Skule. Under the reign of the child King Håkon Håkonsson, the Duke was the most powerful man in the Kingdom. In the Year of our Lord 1226, Skule fell ill. In his prayers he vowed that if he survived, he would...

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The Burial Mounds at Rein

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In 1773, during his journey through Norway with the aim of writing a grand work on Norwegian history, historian Gerhard Schøning looks out across the landscape of Stadbygda in Rissa. He is overwhelmed by the amount of burial mounds placed one after the other alongside the fjord, as far as the eye can see. He...

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The Hovde Burial Mound

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A burial mound clearly marked and highly visible in the flat landscape along the entrance to the Trondheim Fjord. Strategically placed between the fjord and the coastal thoroughfare. An area where powerful men and women have resided. Powerful families with estates and the ability to control traffic across both land and sea. The mound was...

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